Increasing your headlights adds safety for you and other drivers.

Brighten Your Future – Boosting Your Headlights

Whether you drive a classic truck, muscle-era Chevelle or a Chevy Citation, good quality headlamps are a must. Most of us have new daily drivers; these cars often have HID (High-Intensity Discharge) and use far better technology to light your path, making your evening drive safer. The classics we enjoy owning and driving on the other hand, use outdated, less efficient lighting, otherwise known as sealed beam lamps.

A traditional sealed beam headlamp uses a heavy glass housing and the entire assembly must be replaced when it goes out.

A traditional sealed beam headlamp uses a heavy glass housing and the entire assembly must be replaced when it goes out.

Traditional sealed beam headlamps use heavy glass housings with sealed elements inside the lamp have long been the staple (required in the US until 1983) practically every car made from the 1940’s through the late 1980s. When the composite halogen headlamp began showing up in American-built autos in the mid-1980s, the results were a simple and cheap replacement, only requiring the bulb to be removed and replaced, not the entire assembly. As time moved on, the technology of the bulbs increased as well, in 1996, the first HID or High-Intensity Discharge bulbs were introduced. These brighter bulbs illuminate the road much further and wider than standard halogen bulbs, and are far better than sealed-beam headlights.

Sealed beam bulbs generate a dirty yellow light that works, but can be much better.

Sealed beam bulbs generate a dirty yellow light that works, but can be much better.

While Halogen is the main gas used in OE and replacement bulbs for most cars, there are some more exotic gasses available. Xenon for instance, burns brighter, giving off a “white” light versus the classic pale yellow light from halogen. Also known as HID-style, these bulbs cost a little more, but are superior to Halogen in terms of visibility. Krypton is another gas that is commonly found in bulbs. The main benefit of Halogen is that it can actually bond with burnt filament molecules inside the bulb and redeposit them onto the filament, which adds life to the bulb. Most Xenon and Krypton bulbs use Halogen as well as the base gas for longevity. Xenon and Krypton bulbs have a lifespan of 5-10 years.

The clean bright white light of a true halogen bulb shines further into the night and is more efficient.

The clean bright white light of a true halogen bulb shines further into the night and is more efficient.

Transferring this technology to older cars is really quite simple, as long as you take the time to make the conversion properly. Pilot Automotive manufactures H4 conversions for sealed beam headlamps. These plastic housings are lighter, more durable, and come in various shapes and sizes to fit most older vehicles, the most common being the round 5 12” version, though we needed 7” units for our ’67 C10 truck. These housings are a direct replacement for the sealed beam housings. This opens the options for bulbs, which can be standard H4 halogen bulbs, which are a little brighter than the sealed beam lamps and can be run using the stock wiring.

The 1967 Chevy truck has 7" sealed beams, which we are converting to H4-style mounts with Pilot Automotive housings and bulbs.

The 1967 Chevy truck has 7″ sealed beams, which we are converting to H4-style mounts with Pilot Automotive housings and bulbs.

Unless you are going to use standard H4 halogen bulbs, you will need to supply extra amperage to the bulbs. This is a crucial step for using XenonKrypton or anything other than STOCK replacement style Halogen bulbs, but it is highly suggested that you update the wiring regardless of the style of bulb you use. While you could sort out the relays, plugs and build your own harness, Painless Performance has already done the hard work for you. Their H4 conversion harness plugs into the stock plug (GM square style, our truck round plugs), 2 wires run to the battery and it has 2 plugs for the headlights. The kit uses 2 relays and larger gauge wire to safely supply the bulbs with the higher amperage they require. If you plugged in a high-output bulb, the stock wires will literally melt and can burn down the entire car (it happens quite often). Replacing the stock wiring with this harness will increase the brightness of the stock-style lamps as well.

The housing looks like the original sealed beam unit, but the bulb is separate. These also have "angel eyes" for a custom look.

The housing looks like the original sealed beam unit, but the bulb is separate. These also have “angel eyes” for a custom look.

We replaced the stock sealed beam headlamps with Pilot H4 conversion, Pilot Hyper-White Xenon HID-style bulbs and a Painless Performance wiring kit. While not a true HID system, which requires a ballast to supply the higher voltages (and costs a hefty sum), HID-style bulbs offer the look and near the performance in a simple system. The results were rather impressive; the lights are brighter and shine with an intense white light that really illuminates the road. We also opted for the “Angel Eyes” housings, which is a lit ring around the lamp, similar to modern European cars. While not for everybody, angel eyes add a unique look and in our case, really add a trick feature for the truck as we wired the angel eyes to the turn signals.

The factory headlamp buckets have to be modified to fit the larger opening of the H4 housing. This varies from car to car.

The factory headlamp buckets have to be modified to fit the larger opening of the H4 housing. This varies from car to car.

 

The Painless Performance wiring harness has the correct plugs and is almost a plug-n-play install.

The Painless Performance wiring harness has the correct plugs and is almost a plug-n-play install.

 

The only real wiring that is required is mounting the relays and making two connections- battery positive and ground.

The only real wiring that is required is mounting the relays and making two connections- battery positive and ground.

 

We wired the angel eyes to the turn signals, so that they only light up when the turn signals are on. This is an option, you can buy non-angel eye (or halo) housings as well.

We wired the angel eyes to the turn signals, so that they only light up when the turn signals are on. This is an option, you can buy non-angel eye (or halo) housings as well.

 

To learn more about NAPA AutoCare, visit www.NAPAAutoCare.com.

 

about author

Jefferson Bryant

A life-long gearhead, Jefferson Bryant spends more time in the shop than anywhere else. His career began in the car audio industry as a shop manager, eventually working his way into a position at Rockford Fosgate as a product designer. In 2003, he began writing tech articles for magazines, and has been working as an automotive journalist ever since. His work has been featured in Car Craft, Hot Rod, Rod & Custom, Truckin’, Mopar Muscle, and many more. Jefferson has also written 4 books and produced countless videos. Jefferson operates Red Dirt Rodz, his personal garage studio, where all of his magazine articles and tech videos are produced.

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