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How to Reset an Oil Change Light

You just changed your vehicle’s motor oil and oil filter and recycled both. Mission accomplished! But when you slip behind the wheel of your vehicle and activate the ignition, you notice the oil change maintenance light is still illuminated. What gives? Sometimes, the light needs to be manually reset. Instructions for doing so vary by model, but here’s a look at how to reset an oil change light for several popular models.

Chevrolet and GMC Models Without a VIC

The following instructions cover the model year 2005, as well as older GMC products and Chevrolet vehicles without a vehicle information center (VIC). To reset the oil change light, follow these two steps:

  1. Slip behind the wheel and close all doors. Insert the key in the ignition and turn the key to the accessory position. At this point, the instrument panel will illuminate.
  2. Next, depress the accelerator to the floor within the first five seconds of turning the key. Keep your eye on the oil light, as it should flash before turning off. You can then release the pedal, turn off the ignition and remove the key.

If the light fails to turn off, repeat the process.

Chevrolet and GMC Models With a VIC

If you own a GMC or Chevrolet vehicle from 2006 or later, then it has a VIC, and the instructions are a little different:

  1. Turn the ignition key to the accessory position.
  2. With the oil message displayed, locate the enter button on the driver information center. Press and hold the button for one second. The panel will acknowledge your reset, allowing you to move the key to the off position.
  3. Start the vehicle. The oil change light will stay off until it is time to change your oil again.

Jeep Wrangler

For certain Jeep products, including the Wrangler, how to reset an oil change light is as follows:

  1. Insert the key into the ignition and turn it to the “on” position without starting the engine.
  2. Depress the gas pedal slowly three successive times within 10 seconds.
  3. At this point, the system should have reset. You can verify by turning the ignition off and then on again. If the light is still on, repeat the process. Otherwise, turn the ignition off and remove the key.

Honda Accord

The steps for turning off the oil change light for some Honda products, including the Accord, are as follows:

  1. Insert the key into the ignition, turning it without starting the engine.
  2. Locate the “select” stem near the speedometer and press it until you see the word “oil” or a wrench icon appear. Press and hold the stem for 10 seconds, or until the icon begins flashing.
  3. Release the stem and hold “select” again for five more seconds. The oil change light should disappear until the next time a change is due. If it doesn’t, then repeat these steps.

If you’re not certain how to reset an oil change light for your particular vehicle, turn to your owner’s manual, where the instructions are typically found in the section discussing motor oil. The steps required may vary — not just by manufacturer, but often by model and model year.

Check out all the maintenance parts available on NAPA Online or trust one of our 16,000 NAPA AutoCare locations for routine maintenance and repairs. For more information on how to reset an oil change light, chat with a knowledgeable expert at your local NAPA AUTO PARTS store.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.

about author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan has maintained his love for cars ever since his father taught him kicking tires can be one way to uncover a problem with a vehicle’s suspension system. He since moved on to learn a few things about coefficient of drag, G-forces, toe-heel shifting, and how to work the crazy infotainment system in some random weekly driver. Matt is a member of the Washington Automotive Press Association and is a contributor to various print and online media sources.

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